Date of Award

6-1991

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Human Biodynamics

Supervisor

Timothy D. Lee

Language

English

Abstract

Two experiments are reported that examined whether KR was necessary to develop a representation through observational motor learning. Subjects observed a learning model perform three variations of a three segment timing task and then performed two transfer tasks. The first experiment found that a cognitive representation could be formed through observational learning, even when KR was not provided during acquisition. This was determined since there were no differences in performance of the two observer groups on the transfer tests. The observers were however, better than the control group on the transfer tests. Evidence for the development of a cognitive representation was also found when auditory information was eliminated during acquisition on the second experiment. Once again there were no differences in the perforrnance of the two observer groups. These results were discussed in reference to observational motor learning and the necessity of knowledge of results to acquire movement skills.

McMaster University Library

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