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Date of Award

Fall 2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Supervisor

T. Kirubarajan

Language

English

Committee Member

I. Bruce, S. Sirouspour

Abstract

In this thesis the problem of multitarget tracking in multistatic sensor networks is studied. This thesis focuses on tracking airborne targets by utilizing transmitters of opportunity in the surveillance region. Passive Coherent Location (PCL) system, which uses existing commercial signals (e.g., FM broadcast, digital TV) as the illuminators of opportunity for target tracking, is an emerging technology in air defence systems. PCL systems have many advantages over conventional radar systems such as low cost, covert operation and low vulnerability to electronic counter measures.

One of another opportunistic signals available in the surveillance region is multipath signal. In this thesis, the multipath target return signals from distinct propagation modes that are resolvable by the receiver are exploited. When resolved multipath returns are not utilized within the tracker, i.e., discarded as clutter, potential information conveyed by the multipath detections of the same target is wasted. In this case, spurious tracks are formed using target-originated multipath measurements, but with an incorrect propagation mode assumption. Integrating multipath information into the tracker (and not discarding it) can help improve the accuracy of tracking and reduce the number of false tracks.

In this thesis, these opportunistic measurements, i.e., commercial broadcast signals measurements in PCL tracking and resolvable multipath target return measurements in multipath assisted tracking are exploited. We give the optimal formulations for all of the above problems as well as the performance evaluations using PCRLB. Simulation results illustrate the performance of the algorithms.

Maheswaran_Subramaniam_PhD_0601963_V2.pdf (1816 kB)
Thesis with the full name

McMaster University Library